ContestsName the Dress #84!

The contest has ended. Be sure to enter again next week!

Winning Dress Name: Laser Tag

Winner: Anna


FashionMarissa Rizzuto of Fashion Bootcamp 101

Meet Marissa Rizzuto, the creator and author of Fashion Bootcamp 101. FBC 101 offers products and services for teens to learn about the fashion industry. They offer everything from real hands-on fashion classes to fashion parties for tweens. Prior to FBC 101, Rizzutto has established herself as a freelance fashion stylist within the industry. She has worked on many freelance projects with everyone from NBC 10! Show, Seventeen, Noggin, to AOL. Lulu*s has partnered up with FBC 101 to help teens get into the fashion community. Check out Rizzutto’s appearance on San Antonio Living below!

Want to know more about Fashion Bootcamp and Marissa Rizzuto? Check out her website here

ArtSticker Madness: The Obliteration Room

 
 
Nope, it’s not paint. 
They’re stickers.
And this is what the room looked like before:
 
 
Installed for the Queensland Art Gallery, this incredible exhibit, known as The Obliteration Room was created by Japanese artist  Yayoi Kusama for her Look Now, See Forever exhibition that runs through March. Beginning with a completely white room, Kusama invited children (and kids at heart!) to help “decorate” the space with colorful circle stickers for a period of two weeks. 
 
 
 
 
 
Born in 1929 in Matsumoto, Nagano Prefecture, this incredible 82-year-old Japanese artist is known world-wide for her conceptual art based largely on themes of repetition, pattern, and accumulation. She also holds the female world record for highest selling price for artwork at 5.1 million dollars.
 
 
As you can see from the pictures above, her artwork is often very tangible and necessarily autobiographical, and the fact that others help to create it is a very interesting note on the nature of art itself. Plus, it just looks like fun. I mean, who doesn’t like stickers?!!

Pics courtesy of the Queensland Art Gallery and Colossal.

GeneralDIY: Wine Cork Coasters

All right, winos; this blog is for you! 
 
For the last four years or so, I have been avidly collecting wine corks, poaching them from my parents’ kitchen, my friends’ recycling bins, and restaurant tables. By the time last November rolled around, I realized that I had quite the stash and it was time to do something with them. After a bit of Google crafty research, I stumbled upon the idea of creating (drumroll, please) . . . 

 
 
Because I was making these for Christmas presents, I did this over the series of several weeks and numerous hours in front of Netflix. However, it’s a super easy project, and the only thing you have to wait on is glue dry time.
 
What You Need
 
  • 8 corks for each coaster
  • Really good glue (I suggest wood glue or tacky glue; hot glue doesnt hold strong enough and it leaves a chunky mess)
  • Cork matting
  • Scissors
  • Ribbon (Optional)
  • Heavy books or other weight
 
 
 
What You Do
 
Step 1:  Glue together the corks two at a time. You want them to be roughly the same width and as close to the same length as possible. Do this to all of the corks so that you have four sets of two corks. Let dry.
 
 
Step 2:  Glue the sets of two together. You can either alternate the directions or have the corks all facing the same way. Glue together and let dry. On the left, you can see that I used plastic corks; on the right, I used real cork. Both options are fun to work with, but I won’t lie:  the plastic ones are usually way more consistent in same-sizeness.
 
 
Step 3:  Measure a square of cork matting that is just barely smaller than the bottom of the cork coaster. (To be honest, the square below is probably a bit too small; you probably want it a little bit bigger, but as long as it gets the bottom flat, that’s what counts.) Cut it out, and glue it to the bottom of the coaster to create a flat base. (Note:  my cork role had a “sticker” base that I tried to use at first, but don’t be fooled:  it pops right off. I just put glue on top of the sticky, and it held that way.) Cover with a heavy book or other weighted object to glue the matting firmly in place.
 

Step 4:  Ta-da! You’re done. If you want to make a cute gift, sign the bottom of two coasters with the date and your name and wrap them together with a bow.
 
 
Tip:  Another fun twist on this is to make trivets for hot plates and pots. I bought $1 wooden picture frames from Michaels, flipped them over, and glued corks in cool batterns all along the frames. I also glued some corks directly onto the bottom of the glass of some picture frames for another twist, like it the one I made below. I’ve already used mine for pots of pasta! 
 
 
Ready to try your hand? Pop open a bottle and get started!

GeneralSite to See: Cutest Food!

 
It’s time to give props to one my favorite new sites, Cutestfood.com. Aside from the obvious eye candy (and cake) the sheer inventiveness of some people will have you scrolling through page after page. So roll on over to Cutestfood.com for a peek at cookies, cupcakes and ice cream (oh my!) like you’ve never seen before!
 
 
 Loving this puppy Bento box and llama-themed curry dish. Even savory dishes deserve a chance at cuteness!
 
 
My personal fav is the pink bear doughnut with one eye munched out, but I may have to give this little elephant pancake a proper syrup bath one of these days.
 
 
What’s the cutest dish you’ve ever seen?