Of all the films in all the film classes I’ve taken over the years, the first movie that, well, moved me to run home and click “buy now” was Miranda July’s Me and You and Everyone We Know. After a few hilarious, yet touching, clips (“Back and Forth Forever” is a delightfully inappropriate highlight-NSFW, just so you know), I was almost embarassed to laugh, but I¬†knew I had to see the rest of this story unfold.
I was expecting a quirky comedy, and it definitely has a few laughs, but to be more accurate: it’s odd, a little bit uncomfortable, but it all feels so genuine and real. I kind of loved it. So when I saw her on the cover of The New York Times Magazine recently, I was thrilled to see her back on the scene, and toting her sophomore film debut, The Future. So far, it’s a hit among the critics, and it’s just recently had a limited release to theatres, so a lucky few of you may have a chance to see it on the big screen (and if you just so happen to be touring European film festivals, you’re in luck!).
The Future has been described in the New York Times as “more controlled”, “tighter than the
free-ranging Me and You but also more mature and tonally darker”, and the artist herself said she was “feeling older and less rainbow colored.” From the looks of the trailer, I just want to see it!
I was even more interested, and honestly, not horrible surprised, to find that Miranda July has almost as many haters as she does fans. To be fair, her art is something that not everybody “gets”, and I don’t always get it myself… A jack of many trades, she is also an accomplished performance artist, writer, and has made quite a few short films and art installations, as well as some web-based projects that I can’t even begin to describe.

Check out some of her work, and you’ll understand why the tagline for the aptly titled article, “Miranda July is Totally Not Kidding” says, “She is one of the most talented filmmakers of her generation. She is one of the most aggravating filmmakers of her generation. Could both of these statements be true?”
At the end of the day, I don’t pretend to “get” it all, but I do have immense respect for a woman with such a fearless attitude, who has to know that most people aren’t going to understand her vision, but would never let a silly thing like doubt stand in her way.