CelebrityBad Girls Club: Keira Knightley for Interview Magazine April 2012

Oh Keira, how do we love thee? Let me count the ways! We loved you in Pirates, Star Wars, Atonement, Pride & Prejudice, Bend It Like Beckham, and about a billion other films. With both Anna Karenina and Seeking a Friend for the End of the World in the wraps, she said down with filmmaker David Cronenberg, the director of her 2011 A Dangerous Method, for the April issue of Interview magazine. In addition to looking totally smokin’ and incredibly badass, she chatted a little about life, work, and her career.

 
 
On how she’s doing and where she is: “I’m good. I’m in London. I’ve just left somebody in the kitchen making a chicken curry, and I was meant to be helping him, but now I’m not.” 
 
 
 
 
On portraying a real person vs. a fictional one: “There’s always the moral question when you’re playing real people. Is it like dancing over somebody’s grave? What’s nice about playing somebody real is that generally there’s more information about them, so a lot of the questions that you’d otherwise have to make up the answers to are already there.
 
 
 
On choosing roles: “If I had to make a choice, it would be to do the performance-based pieces, which, generally speaking, are the less technical pieces. When you’re working in a space where it’s really about the technical side of it, then it’s even harder to maintain a performance because you have todo things so many times from so many different angles. It’s actually something that I would like to figure out. I’m quite interested to see whether you could maintain a high-energy performance in that kind of technical arena.”
 
 
  Read the rest of the interview here!

  (Pics, quotes, and info courtesy of Fashion Fame, Interview Magazine, and Zimbio.)

ArtWTF Art History

Art History class just got waaaayyy less boring. 
 
I recently stumbled across, WTF Art History, a tumblr created “for everyone interested in art history who has asked, WTF?” And seriously – there are a ton of things out there that fit the bill. This blog is fantastic, because whoever runs it has compiled artwork from the past few centuries into pretty much every funny, awkward, and innappropriate category you can think of, with a couple of random awesome ones just thrown in there for fun. And to top it off, the captions for each post are hilarious.
 
Check out a few of my favorite WTF pictures below.
 
Francesco del Cossa, Saint Lucy(detail), c. 1473/1474, tempera on panel.  National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
 
Marinus van Reymerswaele, Two Tax Gatherers, ca. 1540, oil on panel.  The National Gallery, London
 
Thomas Rowlandson, Theatrical Leap Frog,  1804, etching and watercolor.  Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco
Giuseppe Arcimboldo, Spring (Allegory of Spring),1573, oil on canvas.  Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, Madrid
 
Caravaggio, Medusa, 1597, oil on canvas mounted on wood.  Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
 
Chen Wenling, What You See May Not Be Real, 2009, fiberglass and paint. Installation in Beijing Art Gallery in 2009
 

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Four Figures on a Step, c. 1655-60, oil on canvas.  Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas
 
Giovanni Cariani, Saint Agatha, c. 1516-1517, oil on canvas.  National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh
 
There are a lot more inappropriate captions and awkward photos that I couldn’t in good conscience post on here, but feel free to check ‘em out on the website for yourself. After all, it’s educational!

CelebrityLove It or Leave It: Rooney Mara’s New ‘Do

Remember her?
 
 
Yeah, you know, the badass chick from the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo?
 
Also known as Rooney Mara, this incredible actress has been making headlines everywhere for her edgy haircut and punk rock style . . . until now. In preparation for her role in the upcoming film The Bitter Pill, the ravishing Rooney has added ombre extensions and ditched the edgy makeup and piercings for a complete makeover.
 
 
So what do you think? Do you prefer the innocent new ‘do, or are you waiting for her return to the dark side?
 

General10 Classic Books That Aren’t Boring

Long days and sunny weather are in the forecast, and for me, that’s always meant tan time with a stack of my favorite books! This year, setting aside my unfortunate pile of chick-lit, I’ve decided to dig into some of the classics. Yeah, I know, mental groan, right? Dreary, with big words and a decided lack of anything particularly interesting. Well, that’s what I thought, too, until I decided to change my tune. Could I find any classics that were actually FUN? 

After sorting through some of my old faves and inquiring from friends and family, I present you with a list of classics that are pretty awesome and decidedly unboring.
Jane Austen, 1813
Okay, if you’re into girly love stories, this book might not be for sure. But if you are into romance and grand guestures of affection and gentlemen and dances, then you can’t go wrong. Mr. Darcy will always be my first love.
Mary Shelley, 1823
Widely recognized as one of the first examples of science fiction, Frankenstein is about a monster created in a lab and all the human emotions he and his creator go through. Terrifying, creepy, and awesome all at once. Props to Mary for writing it when she was only eighteen.
Alexandre Dumas, 1855
As the girl whose Netflix queue doesnt even recognize the word “drama,” I still love this book. Here’s the Wiki summary:  “It focuses on a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty.” There is buried treasure, hot pirates, and tons of page-turning action. 
Bram Stoker, 1897
Although nowhere near as hot as Eric Northman, Count Dracula is still the original badass vampire. With all the adaptations and spin-offs, it’s a great idea to read how modern vampires got their start. Plus, if you like a certain amount of creep-factor, the Count will do it.
J.D. Salinger, 1951
Often cited as one of the best 100 books of the twentieth century, Catcher in the Rye is chock full of issues that we deal with every day – identity, belonging, connection, and alienation. It’s told from the point of view of Holden Caulfield, a 17 year-old in a mental hospital who describes the events at occured in his prep school the previous December. Fun fact:  it‘s also got a lot of sex and cussing in it.
William Golding, 1954
 
Any Hunger Games fans out there? Well, a friend described Lord of the Flies to me like this: “So, Lord of the Flies = a mixture of ‘Survivor’/Hunger Games, only it’s well-written. Also a quick read.” Sold, right? 
Arthur Conan Doyle, 1892
There is a reason they made it into a movie. It’s action and crime and mystery at it’s best. Just imagine Robert Downey Jr. whenever you’re reading. Also imagine reading with an English accent; way more fun that way.
C.S. Lewis, 1950
Again, there’s a reason they made it a movie. Magical closets we all wish we had when we were little, talking animals, hidden worlds, and epic batttles. Oh yeah, and the main characters get to be kings and queens. It’s like the most amazing combination of fantasy and fun I’ve ever read.
F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1925
So, you probably had to read this in high school and hate the fact that I put it on this list. However, I dare you to go back and read it again when you’re not forced to write a comparative essay on it. Here’s how Cliffs Notes describes it: “The Great Gatsby follows Jay Gatsby, a man who orders his life around one desire: to be reunited with Daisy Buchannan,the love he lost five years earlier. Gatsby’s quest leads him from poverty to wealth, into the arms of his beloved, and eventually to death.” It’s set in the prosperous 1920s, so if you’re a flapper at heart this book is for you.
J.M. Barrie, 1911
Okay, I take back the Mr. Darcy crush; Peter Pan was definitely my first and most favorite boy of all time. And honestly, I can’t think of a better time to read about endless childhood and Lost Boys and fairies and flying than those self-same magical days of summer.

One of the greatest things about classics today is that nearly all of them are available online for FREE! The link on each title of the ten books I listed above will take you to the e-book or downloadable link for the book, in case you want to read them on your phone or computer on lunch breaks. Kindles and Nooks often have these available for free as well, as do websites like Goodreads, Open Culture, and ePub Bud.
 
So, have I convinced you yet? Will you add any of these to your “fun” summer reading?
(Pics courtesy of Tumblr.)

GeneralSite to See: Hello Giggles

If you love Zooey Deschanel, then you are going to swoooon over this site:
 
“Founded by actress/musician ZOOEY DESCHANEL, producer SOPHIA ROSSI and writer/Internet Sensation MOLLY MCALEER, hellogiggles.com is the ultimate entertainment destination for smart, independent and creative females. Everything hosted on the site will be lady-friendly, so visitors need not worry about finding the standard Boys Club content that makes many entertainment sites unappealing to so many of us.”
 
 
This site has articles on pretty much everything you could ever want, from awesome recipes to outfit inspirations, to video games, art, and work-related topics. I seriously can (okay, fine, have) spent hours perusing everything on here, and I love the quirky off-beat humor that threads through every article and has Zooey and her friends written all over it.
 
 
In addition to music, videos, shopping, and discussion forums, the individual categories include Entertainment, Treats, Beauty, Fresh Giggles, Cuteness, Home, Social Studies, Rants, Raves, How-Tos, Hot Moms, Hee Haw, and the Daily. You need it, they have it!
 
Intrigued yet? Head on over to Hello Giggles to check it out for yourself, or find them on Facebook and YouTube!