Category: Art

ArtDIY Decorations: Thanksgiving Wreath!

With Thanksgiving just around the corner (eek, next Thursday?!), it’s time to put your Christmas music on hold and get to work on some decorations for THIS holiday. My house is currently barren of any decorations, so as I was hunting around the internet for some fun crafts, I decided that I needed something easy and quick to spice things up in a hurry.
 
Luckily, my good friend Ashley found this idea from craftingmom.com that’s both beautiful and fast. We both tried it, and now I am passing it onto you lovely ladies!
 
 
 
What You Need:
 
Wreath (crafting stores have premade ones, or you can make your own) 
Felt sheets (depending on how many flowers you want, you’ll need 4-6 sheets, any colors)
Hot glue
Scissors
Fake berries
 
What You Do:
 
Step 1:  Cut spirals out of the felt. You can use the pattern from their website, or you can just cut out a circle and then make your own spiral. They don’t have to be perfect at all, but do make sure you make a little rounded section in the middle. (Tip:  you want to make the spiral strip kindof fat. If you make skinny strips, the roses turn out kind funky.) If you want multi-color roses, attatch a second color onto the second half of the spiral.
 
 
Step 2:  Now, starting at the end, roll up the spiral. You can adjust the height as you roll to give the rose shape. Once you’re done rolling, leave out the rounded section and cover the rest of the bottom of the rose in hot glue. Press the rounded bottom into the glue, and you’re done! 
 
 
Make as many roses as you like.
 

Step 3:  Next, glue the roses onto the wreath. You can put them all together, or space them out. I chose to clump them together on the bottom right side.
 

Step 4: Take your berry branches and rip them apart so you can weave them into the brances of the wreath. Again, you can spread them out across the whole of the wreath, or place them near the roses. My berries were a little finicky, so I ended up glueing some of them down when they tried to fall out. You can also stick in some leaves if you feel so inclined.
 
Final product! 
 
 
All in all, this maybe took me an hour, tops. I also did it while watching really bad movies on Netflix, so that may have slowed me down as well.   
 
Happy crafting!

ArtDot-to-Dots for Grown-Ups? Yes, Please

 
Anybody recognize this famous lady?
 
Watch this video…
 
 
How about now?
 
 
Allow me to introduce Thomas Pavitte, a New Zealand-born, Melbourne-based graphic designer who makes the world’s most complex dot-to-dot drawings. His first project, the Mona Lisa (above), is composed of 6,239 dots, and took Pavitte 9 hours and 15 minutes to connect. To keep track of all the tiny, numbered circles, he color-coded them to change every 400 dots. Pretty cool. Plus, the smaller and blurrier it gets, the more it really looks like da Vinci’s muse.
 
Since Mona Lisa, Pavitte has moved on to create several more dot-to-dot creations, this time with a transformation twist. The first 335 dots in his Michael Jackson portrait reveal a young Michael, then (Pavitte recommends changing colors) the remainder of the dots morph into the late King of Pop at the time of his passing. Watch:
 
 
 
Also loving his “Yes You Can”/Obama portrait:
 
 
 
What’s so cool is that anybody can do it! You can actually purchase a print online and experience the dot-connecting magic for yourself!
 
Dear Santa….
 
 

ArtRemarkable Remakes from the Booooooom Photo Project

 
 
Some artists have a gift for bringing their subjects to life on canvas. Now, some people over at Booooooom have given us the gift of the “Remake” project, which challenged art lovers all over the world to actually bring works of art to life. LOVE this.
 
The challenge: take a classic work of art, (Booooooom master Jeff says: “I’m not looking for remakes of contemporary artwork, album covers, or fashion photography”), and “remake” it in a photograph (Jeff also stresses: “This is a PHOTO project! I’m looking for photos only. This means no paintings, drawings, collages. The idea is to put all your creative energy into re-creating and re-staging the image. All the work here happens before you take the photo, rather than afterward. Please refrain from adding special effects and other things to your image on your computer.”).
 
And, voila! My faith in humanity is restored.
 

 
Inspired by a contest in the UK hosted by Adobe, Jeff created a challenge of his own, open to submissions from all over this wonderfully creative planet. Users uploaded their submissions to Booooooom’s Facebook page, and then Jeff posted the majority of them on the site. One lucky winner will walk away with the entire Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Master Collection ($899). I’m just glad I don’t have to pick the winner. I was, however, more than happy to select a whole bunch of my personal favorites.
 

 
Some contestants chose to recreate some pretty darn close copies of the original artwork (above), while others took the subject and reimagined it in modern, original, or even silly ways (below). Not to be biased, but my favorites definitely have a creative twist to them.
 

 
I love the way that Wanda Martin reinterpreted Vermeer’s “Girl reading a letter by an open window” as a woman holding a telephone by an open window (below). Love the simple, modern touch.
 

 
Similarly, the way Or Eitan recreated Edward Hopper’s “Automata” in a McDonald’s (above) makes a powerful, yet subtle statement.
 
However, if I had to choose, I think these two might be my favorites:
 
Georges Braque’s “Woman with a guitar” recreated by Niklas Enhag:
 

 
And Emily Kiel’s remake of “Ohhh…Alright…” by Roy Lichtenstein:
 

 
So much cooler than planking….
 
If you want to see more, and there is a lot more to see, go ahead and check out the rest of the submissions (new ones are popping up all the time), and watch for the winner! Just be ready to spend A LOT of time scrolling through…

(Images courtesy of Booooooom!)

 

ArtToothpick-ture Perfect Artwork

 
How much do you love your city?
 
 
 
Scott Weaver has 100,000 toothpicks and 34 years worth of love for San Francisco. This 9′ X 7′ X 30″ kinetic sculpture includes touching personal tributes, like a heart in the center of the Palace of Fine Arts made from toothpicks thrown at his wedding, and strategically placed birthdates of loved ones on clocks all over the “city”.
 
Oh, and did I mention “kinetic”? As in, “movement”. Watch the video below to see the touring ping pong balls “Rolling Through the Bay” on various routes. As if it wasn’t cool enough already!
 
 

 
So this amazing feat of craftmsmanship got me thinking… I wonder what else people have made out of toothpicks…
 

 
Steven J Backman‘s collection includes a working remote control boat, and a large variety of toothpick portraits.
Or, how about a ship? Maybe the Sydney Opera House, the Taj Mahal, Masjid al-Haram, or St. Peter’s Square… Stan Munro‘s tackled them all!
 

 
Including a mammoth “Toothpick City” of his own, including over fifty(!) landmark sculptures from all over the world:
 

 
Munro is currently working on “Toothpick City II“, and the photos are amazing!!
So I guess this what happens when you pick your brain instead of your teeth…

 
(Images courtesy of Colossal, EPICr, & Landmarks of SF)

ArtLauren DiCioccio’s Embroidered Art is SEW Cool

 

 
 
I could try to paraphrase, actually I did, but you just don’t mess with perfection. Artist Lauren DiCioccio says it best in her own words:
 
My work investigates the physical/tangible beauty of commonplace mass-produced media-objects, most recently: the newspaper, magazines, office papers and writing pads, plastic bags, 35 mm slides. These media are becoming obsolete, replaced by the invisible efficiency of various technologies. In some cases, this transition is a good thing- faster transmission and distribution of information, streamlined systems, openness to user input, less waste. But a hole is left behind by the disappearance of these everyday objects. What will happen when we no longer touch information? When newsprint does not rub off onto our fingertips? When we no longer write longhand?
The tedious handiwork and obsessive care I employ to create my work aims to remind the viewer of these simple but intimate pieces of everyday life and to provoke a pang of nostalgia for the familiar physicality of these objects.
 
 

 
As you can see, the original newspaper is still there, underneath her beautiful embroidery. The same is true for her National Geographics collection:
 

 
 
You really get the nostalgia she’s talking about with her “35mm sewn slides“. I haven’t seen these since third grade!
 
 
 
 
I know. It’s amazing. But, I can’t help myself; there is more:
 

 
 
Playing cards, money, books, paper products… You wouldn’t believe some of the other fasincating work this young lady has done. Seriously, narrowing down my favorites was a gargantuan challenge.
 
AND she’s a good samaritan, too. Her “Dear Soldier,” collection gathered volunteers to embroider hand-stitched letters (on her own machine-sewn, lined, fabric “paper”) to members of the armed forces currently deployed in Afghanistan.
 
Wow.
 
(Images courtesy of Lauren DiCioccio and Colossal)