Category: Art

ArtCamel Art: Bikaner Camel Festival of Rajasthan, India

Who doesn’t love a festival? The food, the music, the . . . camels? Yes! Welcome to the Bikaner Camel Festival, a two-day festival that takes place every year in Rajasthan, India.
 
The festival praises the four-legged desert inhabitant with camel parades, camel racing, camel dancing (say what?!) and even contests to judge the best decorated camels.  
The best part of the festivities is how decked out these camels get with elaborate saddles, mirrors, flowers, and more! The competition looks fierce! 
 
 
 
 
 
The local residents take up to three years to master their camel’s fur design, allowing for the hair to grow in so it can be trimmed and styled in intricate patterns. Beautiful. Especially, since it doesn’t hurt the camels!
 
 
 
 
 
Check out more camels and their decor here
 
(Photos courtesy of JeannieJeannie.com)

 

ArtPencil Vs. Camera: The Awesome Artwork of Ben Heine

Twenty-eight year old Belgian artist Ben Heine is probably now one of my absolute favorites. Not only is he a brilliant painter and drawer, but his imagination in creating scenes and graphic designs is just so unique. The internet makes many artists a dime a dozen, but Ben’s work stands out particularly in my mind. This particular series, known as “Pencil Vs. Camera” was begun in 2010 after writing a letter to his family:
 
“Reading my letter before putting it in the envelope, I saw in transparency the television behind the paper. I then realized it would be great to make something similar in a single image showing 2 different actions. I went outside and drew ‘Pencil Vs. Camera 1′ which is very simple and shows 2 chairs with a small table. About 1/4 of the scene is represented on the paper, the other 3/4 happens on the photo.”
 
 
And that’s pretty much how the rest of the pictures in this series are created as well. Each of the papers is done in black and white, while the background is often in color and features vibrant aspects of life – people, animals, scenery, and ideas.
 
 
 
 

 

 
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I just make art for people. I want them to dream and forget their daily troubles. I used to write poems many years ago, I want to convey a poetic and philosophical meaning into my pictures, each new creation should tell a story and generate an intense emotion, like a poem, like a melody.”
 
Want more? check out Ben’s entire gallery of Pencil Vs. Camera drawings on his website. Or, check out his Facebook!
 
(Pics, quotes, and info courtesy of benheine.com.)

ArtIllustrator: Luci Everett

 
I’d like to introduce you to the work of Australian illustrator, Luci Everett, a mistress of paper, watercolor and collage! With a curious, Indie sensibility and a soft, feminine hand, her darling little works remind me of long summer vacations spent journaling, drawing and whiling away hours with handicraft.
 
 
 
Below are a few pages from her book, Pillow Fight, which she describes as, “A visual & experimental documentation of the whimsical, illogical, curious and frightening nature of dreams. A tactile book which documents dreams collected from friends and strangers visually translated in surprising ways.”
 
 
 
 
 
Attention Readers! Do you draw or illustrate? We would love to see your work and possibly feature it on our blog! Email sienna@lulus.com with images or a link to your work!

ArtWTF Art History

Art History class just got waaaayyy less boring. 
 
I recently stumbled across, WTF Art History, a tumblr created “for everyone interested in art history who has asked, WTF?” And seriously – there are a ton of things out there that fit the bill. This blog is fantastic, because whoever runs it has compiled artwork from the past few centuries into pretty much every funny, awkward, and innappropriate category you can think of, with a couple of random awesome ones just thrown in there for fun. And to top it off, the captions for each post are hilarious.
 
Check out a few of my favorite WTF pictures below.
 
Francesco del Cossa, Saint Lucy(detail), c. 1473/1474, tempera on panel.  National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
 
Marinus van Reymerswaele, Two Tax Gatherers, ca. 1540, oil on panel.  The National Gallery, London
 
Thomas Rowlandson, Theatrical Leap Frog,  1804, etching and watercolor.  Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco
Giuseppe Arcimboldo, Spring (Allegory of Spring),1573, oil on canvas.  Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, Madrid
 
Caravaggio, Medusa, 1597, oil on canvas mounted on wood.  Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
 
Chen Wenling, What You See May Not Be Real, 2009, fiberglass and paint. Installation in Beijing Art Gallery in 2009
 

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Four Figures on a Step, c. 1655-60, oil on canvas.  Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas
 
Giovanni Cariani, Saint Agatha, c. 1516-1517, oil on canvas.  National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh
 
There are a lot more inappropriate captions and awkward photos that I couldn’t in good conscience post on here, but feel free to check ‘em out on the website for yourself. After all, it’s educational!

ArtThe Heidelberg Project


Frustrated with the run-down, abandoned neighborhoods that plague the streets of Detroit, artist Tyree Guyton decided to do something about it. The Heidelberg Project is two city blocks-worth of artwork, mainly from found objects, that has taken back a street full of empty lots and burned out houses. 26 years later, the project lives on.
 
“The Heidelberg Project offers a forum for ideas, a seed of hope, and a bright vision for the future. It’s about taking a stand to save forgotten neighborhoods. It’s about helping people think outside the box and it’s about offering solutions. It’s about healing communities through art – and it’s working!


“The HP works with neighborhood children to educate them on art, community and environment. These children walk to school past burned-out houses, rubble, debris, crime and decay. Our purpose is to offer them another view, another perspective – to positively change the environment the children see every day. In the process, we help build self-esteem, encourage cooperation and foster a sense of pride in their community.”

 
(Images courtesy of The Heidelberg Project & Urban Ghosts)