Category: Art

ArtWTF Art History

Art History class just got waaaayyy less boring. 
 
I recently stumbled across, WTF Art History, a tumblr created “for everyone interested in art history who has asked, WTF?” And seriously – there are a ton of things out there that fit the bill. This blog is fantastic, because whoever runs it has compiled artwork from the past few centuries into pretty much every funny, awkward, and innappropriate category you can think of, with a couple of random awesome ones just thrown in there for fun. And to top it off, the captions for each post are hilarious.
 
Check out a few of my favorite WTF pictures below.
 
Francesco del Cossa, Saint Lucy(detail), c. 1473/1474, tempera on panel.  National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
 
Marinus van Reymerswaele, Two Tax Gatherers, ca. 1540, oil on panel.  The National Gallery, London
 
Thomas Rowlandson, Theatrical Leap Frog,  1804, etching and watercolor.  Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco
Giuseppe Arcimboldo, Spring (Allegory of Spring),1573, oil on canvas.  Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, Madrid
 
Caravaggio, Medusa, 1597, oil on canvas mounted on wood.  Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
 
Chen Wenling, What You See May Not Be Real, 2009, fiberglass and paint. Installation in Beijing Art Gallery in 2009
 

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Four Figures on a Step, c. 1655-60, oil on canvas.  Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas
 
Giovanni Cariani, Saint Agatha, c. 1516-1517, oil on canvas.  National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh
 
There are a lot more inappropriate captions and awkward photos that I couldn’t in good conscience post on here, but feel free to check ‘em out on the website for yourself. After all, it’s educational!

ArtThe Heidelberg Project


Frustrated with the run-down, abandoned neighborhoods that plague the streets of Detroit, artist Tyree Guyton decided to do something about it. The Heidelberg Project is two city blocks-worth of artwork, mainly from found objects, that has taken back a street full of empty lots and burned out houses. 26 years later, the project lives on.
 
“The Heidelberg Project offers a forum for ideas, a seed of hope, and a bright vision for the future. It’s about taking a stand to save forgotten neighborhoods. It’s about helping people think outside the box and it’s about offering solutions. It’s about healing communities through art – and it’s working!


“The HP works with neighborhood children to educate them on art, community and environment. These children walk to school past burned-out houses, rubble, debris, crime and decay. Our purpose is to offer them another view, another perspective – to positively change the environment the children see every day. In the process, we help build self-esteem, encourage cooperation and foster a sense of pride in their community.”

 
(Images courtesy of The Heidelberg Project & Urban Ghosts)

ArtBack to the Future: Old Photos Brought Back to Life

Who doesn’t love to open up their old photo album and remember the good times or just wonder what was going on with their hair? Well, photographer Irina Werning decided to take that feeling of nostalgia (or awkwardness) one step further. Why not recapture these moments today? The results are uncanny and totally cool! 
To relive more awkward moments in the past, check out Irina Werning’s website!
(Photos courtesy of IrinaWerning.com)

ArtGuerilla Gardening Takes It to the Streets

 
I’m all about guerrilla art, and the pothole gardeners of the world are just the kind of awesome activists that make me smile. Guerrilla gardening has been around for a looong time, (Johnny Appleseed, anyone?), but I fell hard for the work of two British “pothole gardeners“: Steve Wheen and Pete Dungey.
 
 
Both men (separately) were “gardener(s) with no garden” in urban environments, and decided to take their planters to the streets. Part activism, part beautification, the pothole gardeners add some blooming charm to the concrete jungle, while simulatenously drawing attention to the less-than-stellar state of the streets they decorate.
 
A sample of Pete Dungey’s work
 
Steve Wheen takes it a step further, adding tiny props to his miniature gardens, adding an element of whimsy to the already delightful scene.
 
 


Wheen’s tribute to the Eye of London (see it in the background?)
 



 

ArtDIY: Silk-Dyed Easter Eggs

As much as I love the dip-dying, crayon-coloring, mess-making festivities of Easter eggs madness, I think I might have to try something new this year. After stumbling across this insanely awesome tutorial on Our Best Bites for silk-dyed easter eggs, I can’t wait to give it a go. Wanna try for yourself? Here’s how!
What You Need
  • Uncooked eggs
  • Silk fabric (ties, scarves, or tops)
  • Lightweight fabric (like old sheets or pillowcases)
  • Scissors
  • Twisty Ties
  • White Vinegar
  • Olive Oil
What You Do
Step 1:  Head to the thrift store and pick up a couple of 100% silk ties (or maybe a cool scarf or cheapie top) with some fun patterns. Make sure they’re silk, or the pattern won’t transfer correctly. 
Step 2:  Cut the ties so that you can remove any lining and use only the silk. Cut the silk into pieces that are big enough to wrap around the eggs. Place the “right” side of the fabric against the shell, and wrap it securely around the egg. Secure with a twisty either at the top of the egg or the side, depending on where you want the pattern to be the most prominent.
Step 3: Next, wrap the eggs a second time in a lightweight piece of fabric, like an old pillowcase or sheet or dishtowel. Secure with another twisty.
Step 4: Place all the eggs in a pot of water so that there is at least two inches of water covering them. Add 1/4 cup of white vinegar, and then bring it all to a boil. Once it is boiling, turn down the heat and let them simmer for twenty minutes.
 
Step 5:  Remove from the pot, drain, and let them cool.
Step 6:  Unwrap the magic!
  
When you’re done, you can rub the eggs with a bit of olive oil.
If you’d like to try this with blown-out eggs instead of regular eggs, head over to this site. For more pictures and tips, read the whole tutorial here.
If you try this at home, post some pictures of your awesome designs below!
(All pics and info courtesy of Our Best Bites.)