Category: Art

ArtThe Heidelberg Project


Frustrated with the run-down, abandoned neighborhoods that plague the streets of Detroit, artist Tyree Guyton decided to do something about it. The Heidelberg Project is two city blocks-worth of artwork, mainly from found objects, that has taken back a street full of empty lots and burned out houses. 26 years later, the project lives on.
 
“The Heidelberg Project offers a forum for ideas, a seed of hope, and a bright vision for the future. It’s about taking a stand to save forgotten neighborhoods. It’s about helping people think outside the box and it’s about offering solutions. It’s about healing communities through art – and it’s working!


“The HP works with neighborhood children to educate them on art, community and environment. These children walk to school past burned-out houses, rubble, debris, crime and decay. Our purpose is to offer them another view, another perspective – to positively change the environment the children see every day. In the process, we help build self-esteem, encourage cooperation and foster a sense of pride in their community.”

 
(Images courtesy of The Heidelberg Project & Urban Ghosts)

ArtBack to the Future: Old Photos Brought Back to Life

Who doesn’t love to open up their old photo album and remember the good times or just wonder what was going on with their hair? Well, photographer Irina Werning decided to take that feeling of nostalgia (or awkwardness) one step further. Why not recapture these moments today? The results are uncanny and totally cool! 
To relive more awkward moments in the past, check out Irina Werning’s website!
(Photos courtesy of IrinaWerning.com)

ArtGuerilla Gardening Takes It to the Streets

 
I’m all about guerrilla art, and the pothole gardeners of the world are just the kind of awesome activists that make me smile. Guerrilla gardening has been around for a looong time, (Johnny Appleseed, anyone?), but I fell hard for the work of two British “pothole gardeners“: Steve Wheen and Pete Dungey.
 
 
Both men (separately) were “gardener(s) with no garden” in urban environments, and decided to take their planters to the streets. Part activism, part beautification, the pothole gardeners add some blooming charm to the concrete jungle, while simulatenously drawing attention to the less-than-stellar state of the streets they decorate.
 
A sample of Pete Dungey’s work
 
Steve Wheen takes it a step further, adding tiny props to his miniature gardens, adding an element of whimsy to the already delightful scene.
 
 


Wheen’s tribute to the Eye of London (see it in the background?)
 



 

ArtDIY: Silk-Dyed Easter Eggs

As much as I love the dip-dying, crayon-coloring, mess-making festivities of Easter eggs madness, I think I might have to try something new this year. After stumbling across this insanely awesome tutorial on Our Best Bites for silk-dyed easter eggs, I can’t wait to give it a go. Wanna try for yourself? Here’s how!
What You Need
  • Uncooked eggs
  • Silk fabric (ties, scarves, or tops)
  • Lightweight fabric (like old sheets or pillowcases)
  • Scissors
  • Twisty Ties
  • White Vinegar
  • Olive Oil
What You Do
Step 1:  Head to the thrift store and pick up a couple of 100% silk ties (or maybe a cool scarf or cheapie top) with some fun patterns. Make sure they’re silk, or the pattern won’t transfer correctly. 
Step 2:  Cut the ties so that you can remove any lining and use only the silk. Cut the silk into pieces that are big enough to wrap around the eggs. Place the “right” side of the fabric against the shell, and wrap it securely around the egg. Secure with a twisty either at the top of the egg or the side, depending on where you want the pattern to be the most prominent.
Step 3: Next, wrap the eggs a second time in a lightweight piece of fabric, like an old pillowcase or sheet or dishtowel. Secure with another twisty.
Step 4: Place all the eggs in a pot of water so that there is at least two inches of water covering them. Add 1/4 cup of white vinegar, and then bring it all to a boil. Once it is boiling, turn down the heat and let them simmer for twenty minutes.
 
Step 5:  Remove from the pot, drain, and let them cool.
Step 6:  Unwrap the magic!
  
When you’re done, you can rub the eggs with a bit of olive oil.
If you’d like to try this with blown-out eggs instead of regular eggs, head over to this site. For more pictures and tips, read the whole tutorial here.
If you try this at home, post some pictures of your awesome designs below!
(All pics and info courtesy of Our Best Bites.)

ArtShades of Utopia: Heike Weber’s Permanent Marker Art

 
Who knew Sharpies could look so sweet? Using permanent markers on acrylic paint and vinyl floor, photographer and artist Heike Weber has created these stunning drawing installations in the Villa Wachholtz in Germany. Born in 1962 in Siegen, North-Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, he has been displaying solo and group exhibitions for the last twenty years.
 
Here’s how it works:

“The perhaps most fascinating feature of Heike Weber’s work remains hidden from the exhibition visitor: namely the fact that to begin with at least, everything is white, immaculately white. Before the actual drawing act begins, before Heike Weber tackles the site with bright-colored permanent felt markers, the entire room has already been transformed into a three-dimensional sheet of paper.”
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
I would try to describe what I think of these drawings and how artsy awesome they are, but biographer Martin Engler already said it way better than I ever can: 
“With her unerringly orchestrated spatial creations between Minimal Art and the Baroque, between all-over and white cube , Heike Weber establishes a moment of performative dynamization: she circles around her picture plane – half minimalist hallucination, half a slow-motion Pollock – and simultaneously incites the picture plane to circle around the viewer.”
 
 
Hmmm…my wall is starting to look very bare right about now…
 
(Quote and info from Heike Weber. Pics from Bumbumbum.)