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Hello again!! I’m Ashley, the founder and crafter behind Sugar & Cloth. I’m so excited to team up with LuLu*s to get to share a few home DIY projects with you in a new series: Fresh Spaces. As I mentioned last post, this week we’re bringing the perfect touch of gold to items around the house.

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Nothing makes a statement quite like a unique light fixture, and these DIY golden pendant lights are subtle, modern, and have the perfect touch of glam. Not to mention you can make these for a fraction of the cost of a store bought version, which leaves you plenty of extra room in your budget for that dress you’ve been eyeing.

Materials:

  • Pendant light kit (Ikea- $9.99 for the small, $19.99 for the large)
  • Spray paint in matte in the colors of your choice (shown are mint green and white) and spray primer
  • Metallic gold spray paint
  • Painter’s tape
  • Low wattage light bulb, no more than 65 watts

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Here’s how–

  1. With the pendant sitting flat on the ground, tape of the cord and parts of the light you don’t want painted, and then spray paint the exterior of the light with primer first, and then the color of your choice once the first layer is dried.
  2. After both coats are dried, tilt the light on its side and tape off the exterior along with a piece of tape around the rim to make a defined line between the metallic interior and exterior.  Also be sure to tape off the interior electrical socket so no paint will come in contact with it or the inside of it for safety purposes once the light is in use.
  3. Paint the inside with the metallic spray paint in one or two light coats, and let dry.

Now all you have to do is hang the light with the hook included in the kit with a low wattage bulb and you’ll be left with your new conversation piece. Be very certain to only use low wattage bulbs just to ensure the safety of the paint and its surroundings.

Photos and tutorial by Ashley Rose of Sugar & Cloth